#putaneggonit (Part 3) The Wonderful World of Coddled Eggs

Today I coddled a few eggs and my world changed a little. Coddled eggs are a gently steamed egg that can be cooked in a variety of vessels. This morning I coddled an egg in a tea cup (see above) and this evening I tried 2 in tiny mason jars (because really, what can’t a mason jar do?). Absolute success. This is what I love about eggs. Cooking eggs can be difficult to master, but once you get your technique down, they are awesome every time. For the record, you can buy an egg coddler from Sur la Table, but you don’t really need one, any vessel will work. Although, if I stumbled upon one of these cute vintage ones from Royal Worcester, it would be hard to resist.

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Hello cutie. Royal Worcester egg coddlers.

Coddled Eggs in a Tea Cup or Baby Mason Jar

Equipment & Ingredients:

  • a pot large enough for your vessel(s) to fit inside of comfortably with the lid on
  • small tea cup or baby mason jar (1 for each egg)
  • 3 or 4 large eggs (however many you have cups/jars for)
  • cooking spray
  • hot water (I used my electric kettle)

Directions:

  1. Turn your stovetop heat to high, but do not put the pot on the heat yet.
  2. Using a kettle heat enough water to cover the portion of the vessel containing the egg (about 2-3 inches up should work).
  3. Spray your vessel liberally with cooking spray. (This is the key of getting the egg to pop out of the vessel effortlessly when it’s cooked.)
  4. Crack the eggs into the vessel.
  5. Carefully place cups/jars into the pot.
  6. When the water boils, slide the pot onto the hot burner & pour water from the kettle into pot around vessels taking care not to drip water into the vessels.
  7. When the water reaches a rolling boil, put on the lid and lower heat to a medium-high simmer.
  8. Boil, covered for 6-7 minutes or until eggs reach desired doneness. The cups/jars will rattle around slightly during the cooking process.
  9. Carefully take vessels out of hot water (they will be HOT) and turn eggs out onto plate or eat from vessel if desired.

“What can I do with my coddled eggs?” you may say. I’m glad you asked. Here’s a few suggestions:

  1. Make a Steak & Egg McMuffin of sorts. One of my favorites is a coddled egg, on a toasted English muffin, with sautéed mushrooms & onions, and a bit of leftover steak.
  2. Have it on top of a slice of cold pizza.
  3. Atop your Ramen, Soba, or Odon noodles.
  4. Make your own EggSlut

“What’s an EggSlut?” Great question. While scouring the internet for ideas to further fuel my egg obsession I came across EggSlut. It’s a food truck (food trucks are so hot right now) based out of LA, that makes all manner of egg/breakfast sandwiches. Their star is the Slut, which is described as “a coddled egg on top of a smooth potato purée, poached in a glass jar and served with a demi baguette”. Oh man. I really had to give that a try!

Coddled Egg with Mashed Potatoes and Cheese (AKA EggSlut)

Equipment & Ingredients:

  • small mason jar (1 for each EggSlut)
  • a pot large enough for your jars to fit inside of comfortably with the lid on
  • 3 or 4 large eggs (however many you have cups/jars for)
  • cooking spray
  • hot water (I used my electric kettle)
  • about 1/3 C mashed potatoes per jar (I do mine with heavy cream & plenty of butter. Sometimes with the skins left on.)
  • about 1/4 C shredded cheddar cheese per jar

Directions:

  1. Turn your stovetop heat to high, but do not put the pot on the heat yet.
  2. Using a kettle heat enough water to cover the portion of the jar containing the egg (about 2-3 inches up should work).
  3. Spray your jar liberally with cooking spray. **very important step**
  4. Put a scoop of mashed potatoes in the bottom of each jar. You want the mashed potatoes to come about an inch to an inch & a half up the side of the jar.

    IMG_0016_2

    These are homemade mashed potatoes with the skins on (I like the texture) but this would also be a great recipe for using up leftover mashed potatoes.

  5. Sprinkle shredded cheese on top of the potatoes.

    IMG_0017_2

    The jars are in the pot here. #YOLO

  6. Crack an egg into each jar. IMG_0018_2
  7. Carefully place jars into the pot.
  8. When the water boils, slide the pot onto the hot burner & pour water from the kettle into pot around jars taking care not to drip water into the jars.
  9. When the water reaches a rolling boil, put the lid on the pot and lower heat to a medium-high simmer.

    IMG_0020_2

    This is right before I covered it. The water is at a good, rolling boil.

  10. Boil, covered for 6-7 minutes or until eggs reach desired doneness. The jars will rattle around slightly during the cooking process.
  11. Carefully take vessels out of hot water (they will be HOT). You can turn your EggSlut out onto a plate or enjoy it right out of the jar with some toast or an English muffin.
Slide1

Beautiful & delicious finished “Eggslut”. You can give her a more family-friendly name if you want to… 🙂

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